Posts Tagged ‘Chip’

Win Your Share Of $10,000 In Freerolls With CarbonPoker’s Chip King

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 12:30 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , $10000, CarbonPoker's, Chip, Freerolls, King, Share

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Latin Series of Poker: Chip Leader Alberto Cartin

Alberto CartinAlberto Cartin has emerged as one to watch during the Latin Series of Poker Millions. The Costa Rican guitarist finished Day 1C with the overall chiplead with about 377,000 and then went on to bag up the most chips on Day 2 as well. When Day 3 began, Cartin was sitting with over 816,000 in chips with 72 players remaining and the blinds at 2,000-4,000. Cartin has $ 18,086 in online winnings and three online titles. Card Player spoke with Cartin for a few minutes at the end of Day 2.

You ended Day 1C as the chipleader and you are once again ending the night as chipleader on Day 2. Did you have any key hands were most of those chips came from or did you just steadily gain all day?

I had two major hands. I had a hand with Bolivar Palacios which was about 300 or so, and at the other table I basically called an all-in with a rivered set versus a possible flush, possible straight draw and it came out to be a bluff. So that was really good.

Do you play a lot of tournaments?

Mostly online. In Costa Rica I play tournaments live but not outside there.

So you have never played in a tournament like this before?

No, this is my first time.

Alberto CartinGiven that this is your first time in a tournament of this size yet you are doing very well, how are you feeling about your chances going forward?

Well I don’t take anything for granted. There are 72 people left and all though I have a lot of chips it’s really deep and everybody has a chance to take it down. So I will try to give my best but I don’t take it for granted.

Are you having a good time?

Yeah, I’m pretty tired but yeah.

For live updates from Day 3, visit www.cardplayerla.com. To watch the live steam, click here.

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 6:30 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , Alberto, Cartin, Chip, Latin, Leader, Poker, Series

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Jose Barbero Bags Chip Lead After Day 1A of the Latin Series of Poker Millions

Jose BarberoCheers erupted across the Majestic Casino poker room as 27 players secured themselves a piece of the $ 1,000,000 prize pool in the Latin Series of Poker Millions Main Event in Panama City, Panama.

A truly revolutionary international poker concept, the LSOP is unique in that instead of requiring a full field of players to come to Panama City in hopes of winning big, multiple Day 1s were held throughout Latin America in the weeks leading up to the final days of play. This means players did not have to put up the money for travel, lodging and food before being guaranteed a piece of the $ 1,000,000 prize pool. From cities across Panama, Costa Rica, Aruba, Colombia, Chile, Peru and the Dominican Republic a total of 48 players have secured their seats and chip stacks for Day 2, meaning they are already in the money before they make the trip.

The first of the final three Day 1s in the inaugural tournament wrapped up just before midnight Friday March 8 when only 10 percent of the starting field remained.

“We were looking for way to make it easier on poker players, instead of having to travel and spend money on a hotel and everything, where they could play in their own backyard. Because we have the relationships with the different betting shops we could put it together with the casinos,” Phil Nagy, CEO of Winning Poker Network which includes LSOP Millions sponsors BetCRIS, Black Chip Poker, Ya Poker and America’s Card Room, said. “It also helps us to get to know the players on an individual basis because we have our people go to each event and introduce them to Winning Poker Network.”

Engelberth VarelaIt was team PokerStars pro Jose Nacho Barbero who managed to back the largest Day 1A stack (336,000), followed by Rafael Pardo (333,500) and Nagy (200,000). With 336,000 Barbero also holds the overall chiplead, surpassing Andreas Praias (277,300), who led the initial 48 players who advanced from earlier Day 1 tournaments.

Barbero, a European Poker Tour and Latin America Poker Tour champion, has nearly $ 2.3 million in live and online career winnings including an $ 800,000 payday for taking down the 2010 EPT London High Roller. In total, Barbero has seven career tiles with two 2010 LAPT main event championships among them – the Punta del Esta main event for $ 279,330 and the Lima main event for $ 250,000. The Argentinian native has three World Series of Poker final tables and two World Poker Tour cashes and now has a chance to add an entirely new tournament win to his extensive resume.

“I love the fact that Nacho Barbero is here because he is a really nice guy and he puts some smiles on the table.,” said Team BetCRIS pro Engelberth Varela. “It’s just better for the game and the whole environment.”

For his own part, Varela set himself up early on to coast into Day 2 when he took the chiplead during Level 11 around 7:30 pm. The Venezuelan pro furthered his lead upon returning from the dinner break, massing a stack of about 100,000, nearly double the average at that point in the tournament. Varela lost some chips as play neared an end but still bagged 90,500.

Varela has nearly $ 100,000 in live cashes coming from finishes in the PokerStars LAPT in 2011 and 2012. He picked up his largest career cash for $ 88,970 when he finished third in the 2011 LAPT Uruguay Main Event. Varela’s two other cashes were good for more than $ 5,000 each in the 2011 LAPT Lima Main Event and the 2012 LAPT Grand Final in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

He will be joined by fellow BetCRIS pros Felipe Montenegro and Bolivar Palacios when Day 2 begins on Tuesday. Montenegro, of Costa Rica, and Palacios, of Panama, qualified during earlier Day 1 tournaments and Varela is looking forward to their arrival.

Day 1A Final 27 Players“I love to playing with those guys, it just makes the game more entertaining,” he said.

Nagy was also happy to make move forward in the tournament.

“I’m pretty pumped,” he said of his advancement. “I’m almost disappointed I made it the first time. Now I have to act like I work for a living instead of just being here playing poker. Who wants to do that while in Panama?”

Cards will be in the air at 2 pm EST Sunday, March 9 for Day 1B. Follow the live updates provided by Card Player Latin America at www.cardplayerla.com. For more information about the LSOP Millions, click here.

Day 1A Chip Counts

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 11:30 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , After, Bags, Barbero, Chip, Jose, Latin, Lead, millions, Poker, Series

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Chan Pelton Banned From All World Series of Poker Events and Properties After Taking Single Tournament Chip

Chan Pelton, After Winning A CPPT Event In July of 2013On Feb. 16, during a World Series of Poker Circuit stop at the Palm Beach Kennel Club in South Florida, Chan Pelton took a single 25,000 denomination chip from his stack during heads-up play at the final table of event no. 9, a $ 1,000 buy-in no-limit hold’em tournament.

Pelton, a tournament regular from College Station, Texas with over $ 300,000 in career earnings, then went on to win the tournament, the $ 47,061 first-place prize and a WSOP Circuit ring.

After video surveillance confirmed tournament staff suspicions that a chip had been taken, Pelton returned the chip, claiming he had taken it as a souvenir. However, PBKC staff believed that Pelton had taken the chip with the intention of adding it to a stack in a future tournament.

This week, the PBKC and the WSOP have taken swift action, banning Pelton from all PBKC events, as well as all Caesars Entertainment properties and WSOP events. That includes the summer series in Las Vegas.

Additionally, Pelton was forced to forfeit his prize money, his ring and points used to qualify him for the WSOP National Championship this summer. The event’s runner-up, Chris Bolek, was then awarded the first-place prize, with the second-place prize of $ 29,070 being distributed among the rest of the tournament players who finished in the money.

“I’m literally shell-shocked,” Pelton told SouthFlorida.com. “This is my livelihood, and this is the first time I’ve even been close to any sort of infraction.”

Although the PBKC admitted that the integrity of the event wasn’t compromised and that Pelton was only hurting himself in the tournament by taking the chip, they still felt the need to make an example out of him in order to protect future events.

“The integrity of our games is of upmost importance and regardless of the intent in question from this incident, we cannot sit idle and risk the stolen chips being re-introduced in the future,” said PBKC Card Room Director Noah Carbone. “We take great pride in providing a fair and secure environment for our valued patrons and this unfortunate incident, while discovered and handled swiftly, should serve as a reminder to players that tournament chips are the property of the poker room and must remain on the table at all times.”

The poker world appears to be split on whether Pelton knowingly broke the rules. On the one hand, Pelton is a tournament regular with years of experience. Surely he should know better. On the other hand, taking one high denomination chip is essentially worthless in future tournaments. The chip was too big to use early on in a tournament when it would be valuable and by the time it could be slipped into a stack, it would only represent a small fraction of the chips in play.

The incident on the WSOP Circuit comes just weeks after Christian Lusardi was accused of introducing counterfeit tournament chips into the World Poker Tour Borgata Poker Open. Lusardi was later caught after 2.7 million in counterfeit chips were discovered flushed down an Atlantic City hotel room toilet. The Borgata is now facing a class action lawsuit over the frozen tournament funds.

Earlier this week, Rosa Nguyen and her husband Vuong Trong were arrested for their part in a counterfeit chip operation at the Maryland Live! casino.

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 11:30 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , After, Banned, Chan, Chip, Events, from, Pelton, Poker, Properties, Series, Single, Taking, Tournament, World

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WATCH: Massive Chip Leader Meltdown In World Series Of Poker Main Event

The most recent World Series of Poker television episode featured the epic collapse of one-time main event chip leader Anton Morgenstern.

The German held around an amazing 30 million in chips with just 24 left in the event, but played far too aggressive hand after hand to give away his big stack. After he took a few hits, the wheels came off completely. It was a blow up of tragic proportions.

2013 WSOP episode no. 18 started off with Morgenstern five-betting an opponent with 8-7 off suit. Unfortunately for Morgenstern, his opponent held pocket aces and shoved preflop.

Later, Morgenstern called Mark Newhouse’s all-in with pocket eights. Newhouse held A-Q and hit a queen on the flop to secure the crucial double up.

Despite all of this, Morgenstern still had a dominant stack — but not for long.

Eventually (starts at around 18:25 in the video), Morgenstern and Newhouse tangled again, this time for the largest pot of the tournament up until that point.

The action began with Morgenstern raising to 325,000 from the hijack. Mark Newhouse called on the button. Everyone else folded. The flop fell ASpade Suit AHeart Suit 2Spade Suit.

Morgenstern led for 425,000. Newhouse just called.

The 3Heart Suit on the turn prompted a 750,000 bet from Morgenstern. Newhouse woke up with a raise to 2 million. Morgenstern made it 3.9 million. Newhouse moved all in for about 10.1 million.

Morgenstern called to put the North Carolina native at risk.

Newhouse exposed pocket deuces for a flopped boat, while an emotionless Morgenstern had AClub Suit JClub Suit for just tips. The German was in bad shape, and a 4Club Suit on the river didn’t change things.

After the hand, Newhouse had more than 22 million, which was good for the chip lead, while Morgenstern had about 5 million and was one of the short stacks.

Morgenstern eventually busted in 20th, while Newhouse went on to make the final table.

The November Nine will play out in Las Vegas in early November.

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 12:31 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , Chip, Event, Leader, Main, Massive, Meltdown, Poker, Series, Watch, World

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Ben Yu: How Much Is A Chip And A Chair Worth?

Ben YuOne of the most overused cliches publicized by televised tournament poker is the phrase “a chip and a chair,” — used when someone bled down to their last chip wins an all-in to become a contender in the tournament again.

When you blind down to one ante, how much is that actually worth? My answer — significantly more than people treat it as.

When you have a single ante, you put it in the pot before the cards are dealt, and are no longer a part of the betting action. Assuming a nine-handed table, each of the eight other players also contribute an ante. Oftentimes, one other person enters the pot, everyone else folds and you are all-in against them.

With a random hand, all-in against a top 20 percent hand, you still have 36 percent equity and the pot you are contending for is nine antes. In this situation, you can expect to return 3.24 antes after the cards have been dealt and the pot awarded. All of the value comes from unplayable hands other players fold, an option an all-in player does not even have.

This is a oversimplification — in reality, the situation is more convoluted, as pots are contested multiway, and in these scenarios a lone ante is not worth quite as much.

If we repeat the above exercise where we are all-in with an ante, except against two opponents with top 20 percent hands, we only have a 24 percent chance to push the pot. In this scenario, our ante is only worth 2.18 antes. Even in this situation, one player sometimes bluffs out the other remaining player postflop, increasing our equity.

Just by having one ante in the tournament, your chips are worth roughly three times that amount. When you have 100 in chips, your equity is actually 300.

Why does any of this matter? How should this change your tournament game?

Many skilled tournament players navigate the crippled stack sub optimally, but meanwhile will also lament the miseries of short-stacked tournament poker in ironic fashion. They complain there are no opportunities to utilize their decision-making prowess and shove any remaining chips in the pot without thinking.

Admittedly, options are constrained while short-stacked and taken to the extreme, there are zero technical poker decisions to make with a single ante. However, there are times when preserving that last ante is under a player’s control and a profitable decision.

Scott Abrams is most known for finishing 12th-place in the 2012 World Series Of Poker main event. However, he had a number of other good results over the summer, including a final table showing at the $ 1,500 seven-card stud event. En route to that finish, he encountered a scenario where it was correct to save his last ante.

It is the last level of day 2 in the $ 1,500 WSOP seven-card stud event. There are 12 people left. The blinds are 5,000-10,000 (1,000 ante). Abrams begins the hand with 41,000 in chips, enough for four big bets with one additional ante.

In this simplified stud hand history, Abrams raised on third street, was called by Caroline Hermesh, who he read for having a pair of split tens or a similar wired pair smaller than queens making up the majority of her range. He bet on every street before the river, and was called.

Scott Abrams (QSpade Suit 3Heart Suit) QClub Suit 4Diamond Suit 5Heart Suit 9Club Suit 2Diamond Suit
Caroline Hermesh (x x) 10Spade Suit 8Spade Suit KHeart Suit 6Spade Suit x

Abrams also bet the river for his last ante. Hermersh thinks for several seconds before calling with a pair of tens and Abrams wins the pot to double up.

After the hand, Abrams found me and exclaimed, “GAHHH! That was such a bad river bet, she can definitely check an overpair or two pair, and I would have saved my last ante those times.” Abrams realized the value of his last ante, albeit a little late. Some of my friends have a motto — “Play bad, get there, never learn,” but I would expect Abrams to not bet again there in the future.

Removing the pot already in the center from this equation, if Abrams bets his last ante and is called, he either wins the pot and one extra ante from betting the river, or loses and is evicted from the tournament. If Abrams checks, he is left with one ante when he loses — an ante we have concluded is worth 3 antes because it is his last one.

By betting there, he is effectively laying 3-to-1 on his last ante. When Hermesh calls, he would need to have the best hand greater than 75 percent of the time for his bet to be profitable. This is not a good price, especially because we spend the majority of tournament durations getting 1-to-1 on our money. We bet one chip, we expect to win one chip. However, because this is our last ante, we are essentially betting three chips, to still only win one.

Deep in a tournament, one ante can be worth a fortune in dollar amounts. Opponents can be eliminated from the tournament and hand us a pay jump if they get involved in a cooler or are oblivious to our stack depth. In Abrams’ scenario, those three antes, 3,000 tournament chips, are worth approximately $ 800 in real money. (With $ 98,300 of the prize pool paid out and $ 390,006 remaining to be played for, each chip has about 80 percent of its value compared to when the tournament started, and at the WSOP each dollar you use to enter the event with gets you three starting chips.)

This trick won’t help you win tournaments on its own, but it is a tool that will help you stay in them. Instead of doubling your stack up, you get to nonuple it. I cannot tell you how many times I have been bled down to a few antes, sneaked up a pay jump, won a single all-in that multiplies my stack five-fold, and come back to be a force to be reckoned with. I respect the power of my last chip — though I could do without the chair.

I would like to conclude this article with another look at the 2012 World Series of Poker. It is day 2 of the $ 2,500 Razz event. There are 22 rounders left — each remaining player is only guaranteed $ 5,904. As reported by the official event live updates:

Brandon Cantu started Level 17 with 4,000 chips. At the time, that was four antes, Now, a level and a half later, he’s our chip leader. Incredible.

He finished in third place for $ 74,269. ♠

Ben Yu attended Stanford University but knew even before finishing that he wanted to embark on a journey to become a one of the finest professional mixed-game players. He made his debut onto the tournament scene in 2010 with a second-place finish in the World Series of Poker $ 1,500 limit hold’em shootout and followed it up in 2011 by leading the WSOP with seven cashes across six different games. In 2012, he moved to Rosarito, Mexico in order to continue playing online and was enthralled to perform well at the World Championship of Online Poker, including a final table appearance at the $ 10,300 poker 8-Game High Roller, and a cash in the main event.

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 12:30 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , Chair, Chip, Much, Worth'

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World Series Of Poker Main Event — Jean-Robert Bellande One Of Chip Leaders After Day 2C

Via TwitterPerpetually broke Jean-Robert Bellande had one of his best days ever in the World Series of Poker main event. After Day 2C on Wednesday, the professional gambler had a top 10 stack of 320,900. The entire field will be in action together for the first time Thursday.

He said on Twitter after play ended for the night: “Extremely happy with 320,000 to end the day. I’ve had two deep runs but never with a stack this big on Day 2 or even Day 3.”

Bellande also Tweeted a photo of his bank account balance on Sunday, saying that his bankroll at the time was just $ 10,738.13.

The deep runs Bellande was referring to were in 2010 and 2011, where his soul was crushed by finishing in 78th and 65th, respectively.

At one point on Wednesday, Michael Mizrachi got moved to Bellande’s left. Mizrachi, who made the final table of the main event in 2010, finished the day with 394,600. While “The Grinder” sat within the top 10, for part of the night he was the chip leader with about 500,000.

Others with big stacks include Stephen Chidwick, Carlos Mortensen, Ashton Griffin, Bertrand Grospellier, Tobias Reinkemeier, Vivek Rajkumar, Allen Cunningham and Phil Ivey.

Everyone is chasing Mark Kroon, who ended the day with 507,300. He is the current chip leader of the whole tournament. The Wisconsin native has about $ 600,000 in career cashes.

One funny moment of the day was when, according to the WSOP, a pair of newlyweds were seated at the same table. During one hand, the husband moved all-in, and the wife called with a pocket pair. The husband rivered a straight to stay alive.

Notable eliminations from the day include Jamie Gold, who did an interview on a break, Tom Dwan and Gus Hansen, who decided to skip Day 1 in order to play cash games, Nate Silver, Eric Baldwin, Jason Mercier, Sebastian Ruthenberg, Matt Keikoan, Jennifer Shahade, Matt Waxman, Todd Terry, Owais Ahmed, Joseph Cheong, Joe Hachem and Daniel Negreanu.

For a look at the events from Day 2AB, which saw Doyle Brunson build a stack, click here.

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 6:30 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , After, Bellande, Chip, Event, JeanRobert, Leaders, Main, Poker, Series, World

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Anthony Gregg Wins $4.8 Million In World Series Of Poker High Roller, Runs Over To Chip Stack Being Blinded Away In Another Event

He started out at a young age playing cards competitively with Magic: The Gathering, and about a decade later used another form of card playing to capture $ 4.8 million and catapult himself into the spotlight of the gaming-for-real-money world.

Poker pro Anthony Gregg won the $ 111,111 buy-in “High Roller” event Saturday at the World Series of Poker, beating out an elite final table. It was his first career bracelet.

The Maryland native outlasted defending champ Antonio Esfandiari (fourth), veteran gambler Nick Shulman (eighth) and, at the end, nosebleed mixed-game pro Chris Klodnicki (second). The final table moved briskly, lasting just 80 hands. Many pots seemed excruciatingly standard.

Gregg’s massive score comes just one year after he staked Greg Merson for the $ 10,000 six-max and the main event, both of which the latter won. Gregg has netted untold millions from the World Series of the past couple of summers, and might be that span’s biggest winner.

Gregg’s performance was a also good example of how winning money in poker, no matter how much it is, is never quite good enough. Poker pros are motivated, in some sense, by a desire to win, in theory, every single dollar and every single chip that exists within the poker economy.

Despite playing for $ 4.8 million, he was essentially multi-tabling, live, at the Rio. The Maryland native also had a stack in the $ 25,000 six-max no-limit hold’em, but he had to just let it blind away while he competed for the “One Drop” title on Friday and Saturday.

When asked if he was trying to win all the money in the Rio, Gregg laughed and said: “I just like playing poker. There is only one $ 25,000 six-max this year, and had I busted the ‘One Drop’ five minutes after registration ended in the $ 25,000 I would have been really bummed.”

After winner photos and interviews were concluded, a disoriented Gregg started jogging, then sprinting, to try and find his $ 25,000 table. He was halfway down the hall in the Rio before realizing he was headed in the wrong direction. He stopped and backtracked, mistakenly going into the “Ladies Event” tournament area, before finally being given some concrete instructions on where the tournament he was entered in was playing.

When he finally got to his table, Gregg received some hugs and congratulations from his peers, but also a question on why he was playing another tournament right away, to which Gregg replied with a smirk on his face, “Gotta grind; gotta earn.” Despite the rush, Gregg ended up busting about an hour later, well before the event reached the money.

The day was also bizarre for Gregg since he and Klodnicki have basically the same group of poker friends and actually lived together in the same house last summer during the WSOP. So there wasn’t a whole lot of cheering for either player during their heads-up match.

“It was like whatever,” Gregg said of how their friends viewed the battle. It lasted just 19 hands, before Gregg’s 9Diamond Suit 2Heart Suit held against Klodnicki’s 7Heart Suit 5Diamond Suit. All the money went in on a 9-4-3 flop.

Despite the “One Drop” feeling, in many ways, like just another tournament on Gregg’s schedule, it marked an accomplishment that is kind of surreal for him.

“I started playing in late 2002,” he once said. “Like many poker players, I used to play Magic: The Gathering when I was a kid, and I sort of graduated into poker. I started having a moderate amount of success during my senior year in high school, and didn’t have that much desire for college. So I decided to keep playing poker while I figured out what I wanted to do. I knew I’d be able to make good money doing it, but never imagined it would get to the level it did.”

Here are the final results:

1. Anthony Gregg — $ 4,830,619
2. Chris Klodnicki — $ 2,985,495
3. Bill Perkins — $ 1,965,163
4. Antonio Esfandiari — $ 1,433,438
5. Richard Fullerton — $ 1,066,491
6. Martin Jacobson — $ 807,427
7. Brandon Steven — $ 621,180
8. Nick Schulman — $ 485,029

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 6:32 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , $4.8, Another, Anthony, Away, Being, Blinded, Chip, Event, Gregg, High, Million, over, Poker, Roller, Runs, Series, Stack, Wins, World

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World Series Of Poker — Amanda Baker Among The Chip Leaders In Ladies Event

This year’s ladies event at the 2013 World Series of Poker attracted 954 players, all of whom were women for the first time in a number of years as a result of the change instated this year, which would require men to pay $ 10,000 to play while women where given a $ 9,000 discount and only had to put up $ 1,000.

Poker pro Amanda Baker has cashed for the third year in a row. She finished 11th in 2011 and 76th last year. With 40 players remaining on day two she was inside the top 10 in chip counts.

Card Player caught up with Baker to ask her thoughts on the ladies event and her success thus far.

Beth Davis: It’s your third year to cash in the ladies event. How do you think you’ve been able to be so consistent in an event that’s not very deep stacked?

Amanda Baker: It’s hard to really say it’s constancy when it’s just three events. The first three years I played it I would get frustrated because I never really went deep. I think I made some mistakes because I would just be too aggressive and try and push people off hands but they wouldn’t fold. I’ve learned a few things in the last few years. I’ve figured out when to push back and when to give it up. I think I’ve picked my spots better.

BD: What are your thoughts on the new rule change for me to enter into the ladies event?

AB: I think that whole isssue gets way more attention than it deserves. I definitely think there are a lot of things in poker about women that bother me; the fact that men play the ladies event gets way more attention than it warrants. One thing that does really bother me is there is so much attention on the female players on how they looks. They’re either criticized for not being pretty enough or not being good enough. Always one of those two things and thats an issue that drives you nuts.

BD: So that drives you more nuts than say five men entering in a women’s event?

AB: Oh yea. I mean I know it bothers a lot of people and it kind of silly that they do play it. But it bothers me that no one talks about these other issues that I think are much more important.

BD: What are you thoughts on the idea of an all ladies event?

AB: I feel that men and women are on equal playing fields in poker but on the one hand I do feel that it does feed into that mentality that women are maybe at a disadvantage so they need a separate tournament but on the other hand women represent 3% of the main event. So we do still need women to be encouraged to play poker. Women are such a small minority in poker, if this is something that encouragers women to get in the game and they love the tournament then why not just have it.

BD: Were you able to accumulate a lot on the money bubble?

AB: I did yesterday. Today I had accumulated some but than kind of gave it all back in a spot that was a mistake. I should of just read her body language and known she wasn’t going to fold. I mean maybe I could have gotten her off like eights or nines or something but it was too risky of a play. So today I gave it all back so I’m about even now, but we weren’t on the bubble for very long today.

BD: If you win this event what is more important to you, money or bracelet?

AB: Definitely winning the bracelet. I mean the money is nice but the thrill of winning a tournament is the whole reason I play.

If Baker wins she’ll score her first bracelet and $ 173,922.

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Published on 6:31 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , Amanda, Among, Baker, Chip, Event, Ladies, Leaders, Poker, Series, World

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Poker Strategy — Samer Khuri Discusses The Idependent Chip Model

Samer KhuriMany high profile poker players started out their career by playing single table tournaments, more commonly known as sit-n-go’s. Samer Khuri, more commonly known in the online sit-n-go world as “Braminc,” moved up the ranks in the online sit-n-go world and was one of the best players in the high-stakes six and nine-man sit-n-go’s on Full Tilt Poker.

After Black Friday, Khuri left the U.S. for Lebanon, where he has continued his sit-n-go career on PokerStars.

Khuri netted hundreds of thousands of dollars by understanding the nuances of these single table tournaments. He recently sat down with Card Player to talk about the Independent Chip Model (ICM) and the role that it plays in forming a solid sit-n-go strategy.

Steve Schult: Can you explain what ICM is?

Samer Khuri: It stands for independent chip model and it is a way of assigning a value of chips at any stage in a tournament. The reason this is even necessary is because chips are not directly related to a dollar value during the course of a tournament the same way they are in a cash game. Because the formula is so complicated for calculating the value of your chips, some genius math guys created the independent chip model and some calculators that we can use to calculate the actual dollar value of our chip stack. It’s a way for measuring the value of our stack.

The term is overused in a sense. People will say things like “ICM doesn’t say to do that.” I think what people really mean to say is that it’s not a good shove or fold because of the value of your stack before and after based on what ICM would tell you. The daily usage of the term has gotten a little more generous if you will.

SS: How does ICM and different payout structures affect how you should be playing in the early stages of a sit-n-go and in the late stages?

SK: In general, it is going to mean that you have to play tighter than you would in a winner-take-all or a cash game format. That would be the first thing to note because when you get into more details it gets pretty complicated. Different payout structures have different results on what your strategy should be. If you are playing a very top-heavy payout structure, with the most top-heavy being a winner-take-all format, then you are going to be allowed to play very aggressively in order to have optimal strategy. Likewise, any tournament with a structure that comes close to that, such as a six-max sit-n-go with 70 percent of the prize pool going to first place, then generally a more aggressive strategy will be the best choice.

Conversely, a more flat payout structure where first place gets paid a much less percentage of the prize pool and second, third, fourth, and sometimes even fifth and sixth place getting some of the prize pool, then ICM will play a much bigger part of your strategy and will result in you playing much tighter in a lot of situations. In general, the presence of ICM will instruct you to play pretty tightly both early and later in the tournament. Now, later in the tournament, if your opponents are playing too tight or if they know they are supposed to be playing tight, you can actually play a little loose so it does become a little complicated and the details become more dependent upon the players you are playing against. In general, it is going to force you to play a tight early game and then a tight or loose late game depending on opponents.

SS: How would you respond to those who say that sit-n-goes are solved. If you are able to make adjustments based on your opponents, wouldn’t that lead to the game not being solved?

SK: I think in the highest ICM games, the games are closest to being solved. What I mean by highest ICM games are the flattest payout structures, like the double-or-nothings. All you have to do in that tournament is play ridiculously tight and make a few steals when you have a few opportunities just to stay alive into the final five. There is a little room for creativity, but in that tournament there really is no real room.

In a game like a six-max sit-n-go, where it’s 70 percent for 1st and 30 percent for 2nd. That is a game that is much less solved and there is much more room for creativity and different strategies that can also be winning strategies. There is no one set winning strategy in those games.

There is also a lot of stuff in between from top-heavy to flat. A nine-man sit-n-go which is kind of the most typically thought of format because it’s maybe the oldest one. It is a little more on the higher ICM side of things. It’s a little bit tighter and closer to the double-or-nothings although still not even close to as tight as the double-or-nothing. It is probably the second or third tightest structure and is a little bit more into the solved area.

The thing about being solved is that I think it is just being used as an oversimplification. It’s an exaggeration but it’s not completely untrue. If you have all educated one of the most solved games it’s going to be either unbeatable or beatable for a very small win rate. The thing is though is that it just never happens.

SS: Can you explain the “ICM Tax” that you hear about so often in sit-n-go strategy?

SK: Using the phrase ICM tax is kind of a user-friendly way of describing what ICM is. It’s not the most accurate way to look at something, but in general it goes back to the same principle of what ICM is and the fact that your chips are not directly related to the dollar value of your stack size and the way that fluctuates. Consider a situation where somebody is going all in and you have to call. ICM tax basically says that doubling up your stack is worth less than losing your whole stack.

If you lose your whole stack you lose 100 percent of your dollar value. If you double your stack, you do not gain 100 percent of your value. You usually a little bit less or a lot less depending on chip stacks and payout structures. So you will never be gaining a full 100 percent while you will always be risking a full 100 percent. You are paying a little bit extra to double up but you are still risking everything. So winning chips isn’t as important as keeping chips in a lot of spots.

SS: Can you talk about how ICM tax affects bubble play?

SK: Whenever you are encountering ICM tax, you are going to need better than average odds to call off your stack. Sometimes on the bubble, you will need 70-75 percent edge to turn a profit. If you are second in chips and facing the chip leader going all in, you can know that he is going all-in with every single hand in the world, including 2-3 off suit, you need a hand that has 70 percent or more equity against his range. A hand like A-K or A-Q don’t cover the ICM tax and usually in spots like this the bottom of our calling range will be either pocket tens or pocket jacks, which will have enough equity against an any two card range to make up for that ICM tax.

SS: Can you elaborate on a situation you have encountered where ICM tax really handcuffs you on the bubble?

SK: I’ve been in this situation hundreds of times where you are on the bubble of a nine-man tournament, so there are four players left. One player has around 1,000 chips, another player has like 2,500, and the big stack has like 5,500 and you are in the big blind with 4,500 and are dealt A-K suited. The blinds are 200/400, so you have about 11 big blinds and it folds around to the small blind who is the big stack at the table and he shoves all in. This player is somebody you know and you know he plays aggressively and you know he is shoving any two cards or very close to it.
Even if he is shoving any two cards, including 2-3 off suit, then you have to fold.

If you look it up in an ICM calculator, you will find that by making the call, you will be losing 1.77 percent of your prize pool equity. What that means is that if you measure your prize pool equity, which is the average amount of dollars you will win, at the beginning of the hand, and you measure after you have called, you will see that you actually have much lower prize pool equity. That isn’t 1.77 percent less than your starting equity. That will be 1.77 percent less than the total prize pool in play.

Normally in ICM studies, anything above .1 percent is a clear call or shove and anything where you are losing .1 percent is a clear fold. We are talking about decimal points here, so when something is 1.77 percent, it’s not even close or even debatable.

Khuri is currently an instructor at CardRunners and Pokerstrategy.com, as well as offering private coaching from his own site, www.Sngexperts.com.

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Published on 12:30 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , Chip, Discusses, Idependent, Khuri, Model#, Poker, Samer, Strategy

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