Posts Tagged ‘Hand’

Poker Hand Matchup: Anthony Gregg vs. Chris Moorman

Outcome

Preflop, with the blinds at 400 and 800 and a 100 ante, Todd Terry raised to 2,000 from late position, Moorman reraised to 4,800 from the button, Gregg reraised to 11,800 from the big blind, Terry folded, Moorman went all-in, and Gregg called.

Analysis

Fresh off the win of his first major at the 2014 WPT LA Poker Classic, Moorman gives us a glimpse into his extremely aggressive preflop play. After trying to pick off a potential steal attempt from Terry with a three-bet, Moorman doubled down undeterred by Gregg’s cold four-bet out of the blinds. Moorman was hoping Gregg was also up to a steal, making a move based on the hostile dynamics between late position openers and the players they try to loot in the blinds. Moorman’s deep stack and the signs of strength from an accomplished opponent might have made the play unnecessarily risky, but these types of preflop antics are part and parcel of Moorman’s success both live and online. Gregg had Moorman in a bad spot, but a lucky flop gave Moorman the open-ended straight draw and Gregg a sweat. Gregg faded the draw, and his new found chips helped carry him to the final table where he finished in 7th for $ 189,244.

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed | Amazon WordPress | rfid blocking wallet sleeves

CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 6:30 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , Anthony, Chris, Gregg, Hand, Matchup, Moorman, Poker

No Comments »

Switch Poker’s €500 Bonus For 12th Million Hand

ABOUT CARDPLAYER, THE POKER AUTHORITY

CardPlayer.com is the world’s oldest and most well respected poker magazine and online poker guide. Since 1988,
CardPlayer has provided poker players with poker strategy, poker news, and poker results. Today, CardPlayer.com
is the best poker information portal for free poker content, offering online poker site reviews and exclusive online
poker bonus deals.

We offer daily poker news, poker professionals’ blogs and tweets, exclusive poker videos, thousands of free poker
articles, as well as coverage from all major poker tournaments in the world. You can also find here poker player
profiles, tournament poker results, poker rules, poker strategy articles, poker books, poker magazines, poker tools
and poker training resources.

Ever wonder who is the best poker player in the world? Check out our Poker Player of the Year race, as well as years of data of poker player results and casino poker tournament pay-outs.

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed | Amazon WordPress

CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 12:30 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , 12th, €500, Bonus, Hand, Million, Poker's, Switch

No Comments »

Poker Hand Of The Week: 2/20/14

Give us your opinion in the comments section below for your chance at winning a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

Ask any group of poker players how you played your hand and they’ll come up with dozens of different opinions. That’s just the nature of the game.

Each week, Card Player will select a hand from the high-stakes, big buy-in poker world, break it down and show that there’s more than one way to get the job done.

The Scenario

You are seated at a seven-handed final table that has just begun. With 2,360,000 in chips and blinds of 20,000-40,000 with a 5,000 ante, you are in fourth place with 59 big blinds.

In early position, you look down at 10Heart Suit10Diamond Suit and min-raise to 80,000. A player with a nearly identical stack size (2,340,000), three-bets to 215,000 on your direct left. The action folds around back to you and you decide to call.

The flop comes down 9Diamond Suit8Heart Suit6Heart Suit, giving you a gutshot straight draw to go with your overpair. You check and your opponent bets 165,000. You decide to call and the turn is the JDiamond Suit, giving you an open-ended straight draw.

You check again, and your opponent bets 255,000. You call and the river is the JSpade Suit. You have 1,720,000 remaining in your stack.

The Questions

Do you check or bet? If checking, are you planning on a check raise, check call or check fold? If betting, how much? What kind of a hand is your opponent representing? If you bet, what worse hands will call and what better hands may fold? What other parts of your line would you do differently if given the chance?

Jake BalsigerWhat Actually Happened

At the final table of the Aussie Millions main event, Jake Balsiger opted to check his pocket tens on a board reading 9Diamond Suit8Heart Suit6Heart SuitJDiamond SuitJSpade Suit and his opponent, Darren Rabinowitz, checked behind.

Rabinowitz showed 10Spade Suit9Spade Suit for a pair of nines and Balsiger took the pot.

Rabinowitz ended up busting in fourth place, earning AUD $ 450,000. Balsiger held on for third place, banking AUD $ 650,000. The eventual winner was Canadian Ami Barer, who took home AUD $ 1,600,000.

What would you have done and why? Let us know in the comments section below and try not to be results oriented. The best answer will receive a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

Post a Comment

Messages that harass, abuse or threaten other members; have obscene or otherwise objectionable content; have spam, commercial or advertising content or links may be removed and may result in the loss of your Card Player Account. Please do not post any private information unless you want it to be available publicly. Never assume that you are completely anonymous and cannot be identified by your posts.

Your Comment


Lost User Name or Password?

Need an account?

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed | RFID | Amazon Affiliate

CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 11:34 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , 2/20/14, Hand, Poker, Week

No Comments »

The Poker Hand Critic: Keeping Your Range Wide Against Thinking Opponents

The Poker Hand Critic is a new series by online pro “gutter23,” one of the top mid-stakes players in the game today. The Poker Hand Critic will break down a hand, street by street, offering up his analysis on all of the action.

The following hand comes from a nine-handed, $ 3,000 max buy-in $ 5-$ 10 game at the Aria in Las Vegas. The game had recently started and the table is filled with local regulars and one recreational player.

The Players

Hero (UTG, $ 3,000): My image in the first few orbits had been tight and aggressive. A few of the local grinders recognized me from previous visits and should perceive me as a winning, thinking player.

Villain (Button, $ 3,000): Young mid-20s male who is loose-aggressive and a winning player. He is capable of both bluffs and thin value bets and generally an opponent I would try to avoid. We have played together in the past but have no history of big pots.
The Action

Hero (AClub Suit ASpade Suit) opens to $ 30.
Villain raises to $ 140.
Hero calls.

I make my standard opening bet to $ 30 and get three-bet by the Villain. Most regulars in my situation would four-bet here but I prefer to call and my rationale is as follows:

If I four-bet from under-the-gun, my value range will be very narrow (A-A, K-K, A-K suited). The problem with having a narrow range is that my hand is face-up and we are very deep. The villain can call my raise, play the pot in position and put me in many uncomfortable situations post-flop.

Playing with a deep stack out of position, in a three-bet pot, against an aggressive player, is very difficult. Online players who are accustomed to playing 100 big blind stacks often fail to adjust their strategies accordingly for live poker. When playing online, if I open under-the-gun for 2.5 big blinds and the button three-bets to 7.5 big blinds, I can comfortably four-bet to 18 big blinds with both my value hands and bluffs and either call or fold to an all-in.

Live poker bet sizings are often much larger, so when I open for three big blinds, and the button raises to 14 big blinds, my four-bet would be to about 32 big blinds. This makes my bluffs very expensive and will allow the villain to frequently call as they will be getting great implied odds with about 270 big blinds behind.

Since I’m infrequently four-betting my under-the-gun hands against a loose-aggressive button three-bet, I will fold or call with the majority of my range. I will call with queens, kings, aces, A-K, A-Q suited, A-J suited and small to medium pocket pairs hoping to flop a set. Calling in this situation allows my range to remain wide, while also deceptively including monster hands.

Furthermore, by calling I keep all bluffs in my opponent’s range which might fold to a four-bet. Given my opponents loose-aggressive strategy, he will often double or triple barrel if he senses weakness.

Against tighter opponents and especially recreational players, I will four-bet aces in this spot. Their three-bets are usually for value and they will unlikely fold to further aggression. Due to the limited hands in their range, I will be able to value bet most board textures on future streets without fear of being bluffed or outplayed.

Flop ($ 295): JDiamond Suit 10Heart Suit 8Club Suit

Hero checks.
Villain bets $ 220.
Hero calls $ 220.

This is not the prettiest flop for my hand, and I feel the best option is to check-call. Folding is not an immediate option as my opponent will be value betting with worse hands and may continue his bluffs. Check-raising doesn’t make sense and I’d be over representing my hand and will likely only get called by a better hand or a hand with a lot of equity.

Turn ($ 735): 6Heart Suit

Hero checks.
Villain bets $ 440.
Hero calls $ 440.

The 6Heart Suit is a good card for me as it shouldn’t improve our opponent’s hand. Folding the turn is too tight as this particular villain will often value-bet K-K and Q-Q and could easily be barreling with A-Q or A-K. It’s certainly a possibility that he out flopped us, but I’m not convinced at this point.

River ($ 1,615): 4Diamond Suit

Hero checks.
Villain bets $ 880.
Hero calls $ 880.

The 4Diamond Suit is an insignificant card which doesn’t complete flush or straight draws and I elect to check-call the bet of $ 880. The villain quickly says nice call, which usually infers that they were bluffing, and mucks when I turn over aces. At no point did I consider raising the river for value as he will fold all worse hands and call with better. Folding this river is not a reasonable option against an aggressive opponent, who is capable of triple-barrel bluffing, while getting approximately 3-1 pot odds.

By calling preflop with aces and disguising my hand, I extracted a huge amount of value. The key concept to take away from this hand is that when playing against thinking opponents, it’s always best to keep your range wide.

Gutter23 plays mid-stakes full ring cash games and has had a great deal of success over the past five years. He was named the low-stakes online player of the year by PokerTableRatings in 2011 and is one of the few cash game grinders who truly understands the nuances of both live and online poker.

You can send in your questions and comments to gutter23poker@rogers.com.

Post a Comment

Messages that harass, abuse or threaten other members; have obscene or otherwise objectionable content; have spam, commercial or advertising content or links may be removed and may result in the loss of your Card Player Account. Please do not post any private information unless you want it to be available publicly. Never assume that you are completely anonymous and cannot be identified by your posts.

Your Comment


Lost User Name or Password?

Need an account?

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed | RFID | Amazon Affiliate

CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 5:30 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , against, Critic, Hand, Keeping, Opponents, Poker, Range, Thinking, Wide

No Comments »

Poker Hand Of The Week: 1/9/14

Give us your opinion in the comments section below for your chance at winning a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

Ask any group of poker players how you played your hand and they’ll come up with dozens of different opinions. That’s just the nature of the game.

Each week, Card Player will select a hand from the high-stakes, big buy-in poker world, break it down and show that there’s more than one way to get the job done.

The Scenario

There are 18 players remaining at three tables in a major, live tournament. Only the final eight players will make the money.

With a stack of 552,000, you are near the bottom of the leaderboard, though you still have over 34 big blinds with the blinds at 8,000-16,000 with a 2,000 ante.

The action folds around to you in the small blind and you look down at 9Heart Suit9Diamond Suit. You raise to 45,000 and your opponent, a solid and creative player with 664,000, makes the call from the big blind.

The flop comes down 6Heart Suit5Club Suit5Heart Suit and you make a continuation bet of 55,000. Your opponent calls and the turn is the 7Heart Suit. You check and your opponent bets 100,000. You have 450,000 remaining in your stack.

The Questions

Do you call, raise or fold? If calling, are you drawing or do you believe you currently have the best hand? What is your plan for the various possible river cards? If raising, how much? What type of hand could your opponent be holding in this situation?

What Actually Happened

Facing a bet of 100,000 on a board reading 6Heart Suit5Club Suit5Heart Suit7Heart Suit, Martin Finger opted to move all in for his last 450,000 against Mike McDonald.

McDonald snap called, tabling JSpade Suit5Spade Suit for trips. Finger could still win with any 9, 8 or non-jack heart. The river was the KClub Suit, however and Finger was eliminated.

McDonald went onto just squeak into the money of the 2013 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure $ 100,000 Super High Roller, banking $ 217,320 for his eighth-place finish.

What would you have done and why? Let us know in the comments section below and try not to be results oriented. The best answer will receive a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

Post a Comment

Messages that harass, abuse or threaten other members; have obscene or otherwise objectionable content; have spam, commercial or advertising content or links may be removed and may result in the loss of your Card Player Account. Please do not post any private information unless you want it to be available publicly. Never assume that you are completely anonymous and cannot be identified by your posts.

Your Comment


Lost User Name or Password?

Need an account?

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed | RFID | Amazon Affiliate

CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 11:31 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , 1/9/14, Hand, Poker, Week

No Comments »

Finding The Line: A Street By Street Strategic Look At A Poker Hand

Playing a hand well requires multiple streets of good decisions, which pros refer to as a line. In Card Player’s new Finding The Line series, readers will be able to let us know what they consider to be the most optimal lines in hands played by professionals at some of the largest tournaments in the world.

Card Player will give the options of a player on each street and the readers can put together what they consider to be the most optimal line and leave it in the comments section below.

The Situation

You are a small-stakes online player sitting in a six-max $ .50-$ 1 no-limit hold’em game. You are automatically topping your stack up to the maximum 100 big blind buy-in and have $ 100 in your stack.

Pre-Flop

You are on the button and are dealt KSpade SuitQClub Suit and the player in the hijack seat raises to $ 2.50. The player in the cutoff folds and action is on you. You both have $ 100 in your stack and you have no history or specific reads on the player. Do you:

A.) Fold – You feel that K-Q has a lot of reverse implied odds and if you make a hand, you will be dominated by a better hand too often to make it profitable to even see a flop. Since the hand is off-suit, it doesn’t flop well and you would rather just look for a better spot.

B.) Call – Your opponent can have a wider range than just hands that dominate K-Q and calling will keep in all of the hands that K-Q dominates. It also allows you to keep the pot smaller and have a better stack-to-pot ratio postflop.

C.) Three-bet – Your opponent is opening wide from late position and K-Q is well ahead of his range. You want to three-bet for value and bloat the pot since you have position on him for the rest of the hand.

Reality

After a raise from the player in the cutoff, Gareth Chantler was on the button and calls with KSpade SuitQClub Suit. Both players in the blinds fold and they are heads-up to the flop.

The Flop

The flop is JSpade Suit10Club Suit8Diamond Suit and your opponent bets $ 4.50. Do you:

A.) Fold – You misclicked, the only reason to fold this hand for $ 4.50.

B.) Call – You think your opponent could be continuation betting this board with air or a strong hand. A raise could open you up to get three-bet off your hand and if he does have a strong hand, you want to hit your hand before you get lots of money in the middle. You also still have the chance to take the pot away from his bluffs on the turn if he gives up and checks.

C.) Raise – You can get value from worse straight draws and you can possibly take the pot down right there if your opponent was bluffing. If you do get called, you have initiative of the hand and will most likely be checked to on the turn and will be able to dictate what happens.

Reality

Gareth Chantler calls $ 4.50 and they see a turn card.

The Turn

The 10Diamond Suit falls on the turn and your opponent bets $ 10. Do you:

A.) Fold – The price that you are getting on the turn isn’t good enough to peel a card with your open-ended straight draw. You don’t think your opponent is bluffing at this point and your straight isn’t disguised if you hit a nine, so your implied odds are limited.

B.) Call – You doubt your opponent is bluffing at this point. If you hit your hand, you should be able to get paid off because his range is going to be stronger to double barrel this board rather than bet the flop and then check.

C.) Raise – It’s very unlikely he has a ten in his range and your perceived range can have plenty of tens in it. Calling the flop and raising the turn is generally a strong line and you can increase fold equity by making your hand look stronger. Just like on the flop, however, you risk being blown off your hand by a three-bet.

Reality

Gareth Chantler raises to $ 26 and gets called by his opponent.

The River

The river is the 3Heart Suit and your opponent checks. Do you:

A.) Check – Your opponent called the turn and the river is a brick. It’s unlikely his hand strength changed so he will probably not fold the river if he calls the turn. You do not have much, if any, showdown value and are pretty much conceding the pot at this point.

B.) Bet Small (1/4-1/2 pot) – There is only a pot-sized bet left in your stack. You feel that if he is going to fold, he will fold just as often to a smaller bet as he will to an all in shove. If he has a hand like AdKd, where he continuation bet the flop and bet the turn because he turned a big draw, he will fold that hand regardless of how much you bet. So the percentage of time that your bluff works will remain the same, but you will save yourself a few bucks when it doesn’t.

C.) Shove all in – Since you only have a pot-sized bet left, you feel that moving all in will maximize your fold equity. You think that you will get him to fold a jack or an overpair if you move all in and that those hands wouldn’t fold if you bet smaller. You don’t think he is going to check a big hand on the river and you want to give yourself the best chance of getting him to fold a made hand.

Reality

Gareth Chantler moved all for his last $ 67 in and was called by his opponent, who tabled pocket eights, for a full house.

Chantler chose a line of B-B-C-C. Let us know what line you would take in the comments section below.

Post a Comment

Messages that harass, abuse or threaten other members; have obscene or otherwise objectionable content; have spam, commercial or advertising content or links may be removed and may result in the loss of your Card Player Account. Please do not post any private information unless you want it to be available publicly. Never assume that you are completely anonymous and cannot be identified by your posts.

Your Comment


Lost User Name or Password?

Need an account?

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed | RFID | Amazon Affiliate

CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 11:31 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , Finding, Hand, Line, Look, Poker, Strategic, Street

No Comments »

Poker Hand Of The Week: 1/2/14

Give us your opinion in the comments section below for your chance at winning a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

Ask any group of poker players how you played your hand and they’ll come up with dozens of different opinions. That’s just the nature of the game.

Each week, Card Player will select a hand from the high-stakes, big buy-in poker world, break it down and show that there’s more than one way to get the job done.

The Scenario

There are nine players remaining in a major poker tournament, but only eight will make the official final table. With 610,000 and blinds of 20,000-40,000 with a 5,000 ante, you are the shortest stack remaining.

There are two other relatively short stacks. One player with 1,045,000 and another with 1,235,000. Everyone else is deep.

The player in third place, who has 3,560,000, min-raises from early position to 80,000. It folds around to you in the big blind and you make the call with KDiamond Suit6Diamond Suit.

The flop comes down ASpade SuitJDiamond Suit7Diamond Suit, giving you the second nut flush draw. You check and your opponent continues with a bet of 75,000. You call and the turn is the KHeart Suit.

You check and your opponent moves all in. You have 450,000, or just over 11 big blinds remaining. The pot size is 375,000.

The Questions

Do you call or fold? If calling, what kind of a price are you getting? How many outs do you think you have? If folding, why? What does your opponent’s flop and turn bet say about his hand?

Georgios SotiropoulosWhat Actually Happened

Facing a decision for his tournament life holding KDiamond Suit6Diamond Suit on a board reading ASpade SuitJDiamond Suit7Diamond SuitKHeart Suit at the EPT Prague main event, Sigurd Eskeland opted to call.

His opponent, Georgios Sotiropoulos, tabled pocket sevens for bottom set. The river was the 3Heart Suit and Eskeland was eliminated in ninth place, earning €66,050.

Sotiropolous went on to finish in second place and after a heads-up deal, the Greek player earned €700,000.

What would you have done and why? Let us know in the comments section below and try not to be results oriented. The best answer will receive a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

Post a Comment

Messages that harass, abuse or threaten other members; have obscene or otherwise objectionable content; have spam, commercial or advertising content or links may be removed and may result in the loss of your Card Player Account. Please do not post any private information unless you want it to be available publicly. Never assume that you are completely anonymous and cannot be identified by your posts.

Your Comment


Lost User Name or Password?

Need an account?

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed | RFID | Amazon Affiliate

CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 11:30 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , 1/2/14, Hand, Poker, Week

No Comments »

The Poker Hand Critic: Don’t Be Results Oriented With Failed Value-Bets

The Poker Hand Critic is a brand new series by online pro “gutter23,” one of the top mid-stakes players in the game today. The Poker Hand Critic will break down a hand, street by street, offering up his analysis on all of the action.

The following hand comes from a 10-handed, uncapped $ 5-$ 5 home game in Toronto. The game has been relatively tight and more talkative and social than usual.

The Players

Villain 1 (UTG +1, $ 2,500): Intelligent and successful businessman, but a losing recreational player. He is loose preflop, passive post-flop and rarely gets out of line.

Villain 2 (Button, $ 2,000): Competent but inexperienced recreational player who is a small long-term winner. He is a knowledgeable player and is capable of mixing it up.

The Action

Villain 1 opens to $ 10.
Villain 2 (QDiamond Suit JDiamond Suit) calls $ 10.

The preflop action is standard with $ 30 being a typical opening raise in this game. There is no need to three-bet Q-J suited as it plays well post-flop in position.

Flop ($ 70): QHeart Suit QClub Suit 10Heart Suit

Villain 1 checks.
Villain 2 bets $ 50.
Villain 1 calls $ 50.

This is clearly a great board for Villain 2 as he flops trips with a strong kicker. The passive Villain 1 checks, which is typical for him, and it’s difficult to assign him a narrow range. Villain 1 may have bluff-catching hands such as 9-9, J-J, K-K, A-A where his plan is to pot-control to try and get to showdown cheaply. It’s also possible that he is playing flush or straight draws passively or has a hand that missed the flop and will check-fold. In addition, he will occasionally be slow-playing monsters like 10-10, Q-10, K-Q, A-Q.

Villain 2 bets $ 50 when checked to, which is an appropriate bet size for this wet board texture, and Villain 1 calls.

Turn ($ 170): 7Club Suit

Villain 1 checks.
Villain 2 bets $ 140.
Villain 1 calls $ 140.

The 7Club Suit is a brick which doesn’t affect the hand. When Villain 1 check-calls the 80 percent pot-sized bet, we can start to dismiss hands from his range. Without a full house and given the flush and straight draw possibilities on the flop, this particular villain will very infrequently just call the turn with hands like K-Q and A-Q. Villain 1 will almost certainly check-raise these hands, which is a typical play for a losing amateur player.

After discounting these strong hands, Villain 1 is left with flush and straight draws, monsters and bluff-catchers.

River ($ 450): 5Spade Suit

Villain 1 checks.
Villain 2 bets $ 320.
Villain 1 goes all-in for $ 1,460 effective stacks.
Villain 2 folds.

The river is an inconsequential 5Spade Suit. When Villain 1 checks, it is mandatory that Villain 2 bets. Although I’d prefer a slightly smaller bet of around $ 260, value-bets such as these separate a marginal winner from a big winner. Although Villain 1 will fold his missed draws, he will often make a crying call from his bluff-catching range of 9-9, J-J, K-K, A-A.

After Villain 1 shoves, it’s an easy laydown for Villain 2 as his opponent either has Q-T or T-T.

Passive recreational players are never, ever bluff check-raising this river. In thousands of hours playing live poker, I’ve seen it only a couple of times.

After Villain 1 shoves, Villain 2 slaps the table in frustration, contemplates for a few minutes, flashes me his cards and makes a disciplined but correct laydown. He is agitated and upset and says to me, “What a terrible value-bet by me, I’m never going to do that again.” This brings us to the topic of being results-oriented.

All poker players at some point are told to avoid being results oriented and this usually occurs after they get in A-A against K-K preflop and lose. Even though they put their money in as an 80-percent favorite and will show a sizable long-term profit in this spot, they are dismayed. It is painful when “your” pot is being pushed to your lucky opponent. Although this situation feels terrible, if given another opportunity, they will gladly put their money in again preflop with aces against kings.

When Villain 2 expressed that he would never value-bet in that spot again to avoid getting check-raised all-in, I realized that this hand demonstrated a different and far more severe type of being results-oriented. The type where someone makes the right decision, loses the hand, and avoids making that profitable bet in the future.

So what was Villain 2 upset about? It wasn’t that he cared about the actual money lost as I’ve watched him lose far bigger pots and remain calm and unfazed. It also wasn’t because he thought he was bluffed. He, along with the rest of the table, knew that Villain 1 had a full house when he went all-in. The reason was simple; it was because he hadn’t anticipated the river check-raise all-in. He didn’t see the raise coming and it blindsided him.

So what can we do to avoid the pain and anguish felt by Villain 2? Have a plan! When making every decision in poker, especially river decisions, it’s vital to have a plan. Before betting, Villain 2 should have thought to himself, “I’m going to value-bet this river to get called by a worse hand and if he raises or goes all-in, he’s never bluffing and I’m going to fold.” There shouldn’t be any negative emotions after your opponent goes all-in since you’ve anticipated this move and decided your response.

Readers, ask yourself this question. Am I going to be the player who avoids making thin value-bets to dodge river check-raises or am I going to be the type of player who will be prepared for these raises? I know which direction Villain 2 is heading and it’s the opposite of me.

Gutter23 plays mid-stakes full ring cash games and has had a great deal of success over the past five years. He was named the low-stakes online player of the year by PokerTableRatings in 2011 and is one of the few cash game grinders who truly understands the nuances of both live and online poker.

You can send in your questions and comments to gutter23poker@rogers.com.

Post a Comment

Messages that harass, abuse or threaten other members; have obscene or otherwise objectionable content; have spam, commercial or advertising content or links may be removed and may result in the loss of your Card Player Account. Please do not post any private information unless you want it to be available publicly. Never assume that you are completely anonymous and cannot be identified by your posts.

Your Comment


Lost User Name or Password?

Need an account?

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed | RFID | Amazon Affiliate

CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 11:30 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , Critic, Don't, Failed, Hand, Oriented, Poker, Results, ValueBets

No Comments »

Poker Hand Of The Week: 11/29/13

Give us your opinion in the comments section below for your chance at winning a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

Ask any group of poker players how you played your hand and they’ll come up with dozens of different opinions. That’s just the nature of the game.

Each week, Card Player will select a hand from the high-stakes, big buy-in poker world, break it down and show that there’s more than one way to get the job done.

The Scenario

You are in the money and seated at a six-handed final table. With 989,000 in chips and blinds of 8,000-16,000 with a 2,000 ante, you have a very comfortable 61 big blinds. You are currently sitting in fourth place, but there are two shorter stacks with 396,000 and 273,000, respectively.

An aggressive young player raises to 32,000 from under the gun. He is virtually tied for the chip lead with 1,437,000. Action folds around to you in the small blind and you look down at AHeart SuitASpade Suit. You three-bet to 90,000, the big blind folds and your opponent calls.

The flop is AClub Suit10Heart Suit5Club Suit, giving you top set. You bet 85,000 and your opponent calls. The turn is the 2Diamond Suit and you bet 197,000.

Once again, your opponent calls. The river is the QClub Suit, completing both flush and straight draws. There is 772,000 in the pot and you have 615,000 remaining in your stack.

The Questions

Do you check or bet? If betting, how much? If checking, how much of a bet will you call? Will you ever fold to a river bet? Would you ever bet fold in this situation? Is it best to turn top set into a bluff catcher, or should you be targeting more value?

Tony DunstWhat Actually Happened

At the WPT Caribbean stop in St. Maarten, Robbie Bakker opted to move all in holding top set on a board reading AClub Suit10Heart Suit5Club Suit2Diamond SuitQClub Suit.

His opponent, Tony Dunst, immediately called with JClub Suit10Club Suit for the second nut flush and Bakker was eliminated in sixth place, earning $ 28,700.

Dunst took the massive pot and a huge chip lead, eventually going on to win the tournament, his first WPT title and the $ 145,000 first-place prize.

What would you have done and why? Let us know in the comments section below and try not to be results oriented. The best answer will receive a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

Comments

Stefan5


3 hours ago

one way : i would probably check the flop if he is aggressive in hope for check-push, if he checks and blank comes on the turn i am probably all in , if scary card comes on the turn i am probably bet-fold ,if i am called on the turn, if i not improve my hand to have beaten the flush or straight i am probably fold. Of course there is a chance to be bluffed , but with that much strangth showed by me oop and sure pot commited if he bet, the chances he is bluffing are small. in this way i stay behind with about 700k which is about more than 40bb, enough to attack the first position.

second way: i bet about 80% pot on the flop ,in order to make my self pot commited and not give the right odds for him to just call.If he just call ,the pot will be about 580k i am will be pot commited that will allow me to push on the turn and chase my 10 outs if i am beaten. in this way if i loose the hand i am happy with my game , but i just did not have luck. i shake to everybody and take mu 28k$ .

cheers

Reply

Rich3


3 hours ago

You cant check-call the river because chances are Dunst is either waiting for the club or has the last Ace or 10. He’s probably not on a straight draw. When he sees the club he probably doesn’t like it either so he might check behind.

The best bet is to bet a moderate amount where it looks like you cnat fold and if he goes over the top of you, then you know he’s got the goods and live to fight another day. You would be really short-stacked but you would know he has the clubs. And he might pay you off if he doesn’t. He knows you’re not bluffing.

Reply

Post a Comment

Messages that harass, abuse or threaten other members; have obscene or otherwise objectionable content; have spam, commercial or advertising content or links may be removed and may result in the loss of your Card Player Account. Please do not post any private information unless you want it to be available publicly. Never assume that you are completely anonymous and cannot be identified by your posts.

Your Comment


Lost User Name or Password?

Need an account?

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed | RFID | Amazon Affiliate

CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 11:30 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , 11/29/13, Hand, Poker, Week

No Comments »

A Street By Street Strategic Look At A Poker Hand

Playing a hand well requires multiple streets of good decisions, which pros refer to as a line. In Card Player’s new Finding The Line series, readers will be able to let us know what they consider to be the most optimal lines in hands played by professionals at some of the largest tournaments in the world.

Card Player will give the options of a player on each street and the readers can put together what they consider to be the most optimal line and leave it in the comments section below.

The Situation

You are at the final table of a very small, elite, nose bleed stakes poker tournament. You are eight-handed, but only five people are paid due to the small number of entrants. The blinds are 4,000-8,000 with a 1,000 ante.

You have just over 24 big blinds with 196,000 in chips.

Pre-Flop

You are in the hijack with KHeart SuitKSpade Suit and action folds to you. The players behind you are all solid, aggressive players. Do you:

A.) Limp – You disguise the strength of your hand by not raising and maybe a player behind you will raise.

B.) Min-raise – You are immediately getting value from your hand by raising and can maybe get played back at by somebody who thinks you are raising light from the cutoff.

C.) Raise larger (3-4 times the blind) – You are trying to get more value from your hand by raising bigger. You cut down the big blind’s immediate pot odds by raising larger.

D.) Fold – One of your opponents behind you fails to protect his hand while he is checking his cards. You see that his has pocket aces.

Reality

Action folded to Tim Adams in the $ 100,000 buy-in World Poker Tour Alpha 8 event in St. Kitts. He min-raises to 16,000 and gets a call from Jason Koon in the big blind.

The Flop

The flop is 8Heart Suit3Heart Suit2Spade Suit and your opponent checks. Pot size is 52,000. Do you:

A.) Check – You make your hand look like it missed that flop and can maybe pick up value from a turn bluff that thinks you have an ace-high type of hand. You may also be able to induce a double barrel bluff by checking the flop.

B.) Bet small (around half the size of the pot or less) – You continue to get value from your hand by betting and keep your opponent’s range wide by not trying to blow him out of the water on the flop. You can also possibly induce a check-raise from a worse hand by betting on the smaller side.

C.) Bet larger (70-100 percent of the pot)- The board is very draw-heavy. With two hearts and a possible straight draw, you want to charge your opponent the max to draw out on you. Especially with the money bubble approaching.

Reality

After Koon checked, Adams bet 20,000. Koon check-called and they saw a turn card.

The Turn

The turn is the AHeart Suit. Your opponent checks. Pot size is 92,000. Do you:

A.) Check – You don’t want get blown off your hand by getting check-raised by both better and worse hands. You have the nut flush draw and would like to be able to see the river for cheap.

B.) Bet small – You want to continue to get value from hands like smaller pairs and possibly smaller flush draws, but don’t want to discourage them from calling.

C.) Bet larger – You have the nut flush draw. You have some equity against anything your opponent has and you want to commit yourself here.

Reality

Koon checks and Adams checks behind.

The River

The river is the KDiamond Suit and your opponent leads out for 33,000. The pot, including Koon’s river bet, is 125,000. You have 160,000 remaining in your stack. Do you:

A.) Fold – You think the only hand he bets on the river here are flushes and straights.

B.) Call – You think your hand is best here a good percentage of the time, but the hands that you think probably wouldn’t call a raise.

C.) Raise – You think he can call a raise with a worse hand like a set or two pair and you want to get value in that situation. You are effectively committing yourself to calling a jam from your opponent given that you have 159,000 left in your stack before the river is dealt.

Reality

Koon bet 33,000 and Adams quickly called. Koon showed A-3 and Adams scooped the pot with a set of kings. Koon dropped to 373,000 in chips while Adams climbed to 265,000.

Adams was eventually the bubble boy, finishing in sixth place, while Koon rebounded from the hand to finish fourth for $ 298,760.

Adams took a line of B-B-A-B. Let us know what line you would take and why in the comments below for a chance at winning a Card Player digital subscription. We’ll post the results of the most popular line in the next edition of Finding The Line.

Comments

Guy1


2 hours ago

I would go with B-C-B-B.

I would minraise in the hijack because the players behind me are elite and solid. It is unlikely that they will play poorly post-flop, and less likely than amateurs to raise light after a player with enough table image to be at the final table of a $ 100k buy-in limps from the hijack. If you raise larger, you are unlikely to get any calls at this stage.

On the flop, I would bet large. First, as the article points out, it is a draw-heavy board, and I do want to increase value in the pot. but, secondarily, if you bet half the pot or less, the problem becomes that you are creating a pot too big to be given up on, but small enough where an opponent can bluff at it without committing too much of his stack. Example: I have 100 and you have 100. The pot is 20. You can bet 15 if a draw completes, and it’s a hard call for me to make, but if I do, you’re only down to 85, so you will probably bluff at it more often. If we both have 100 and the pot is 60, now you have to bet 30-50 to bluff at it, and if I call you’re out half your stack, which will induce more check-folding when you don’t make your hand, or checking with intent to raise when they do, and you can just check behind, and avoid paying them off.

On the turn, I would bet, but bet small. I’m making a pseudo-blocking bet here; if he has made his flush, he will either checkraise me now, allowing me to dump the hand if I don’t read bluff, or he will call and either check again on the river with the intent to checkraise, to which I can check behind, or make one of those increasingly-common river bets which are, in my experience, easy to read. Also, if my hand is good, I’m still increasing value.

By the river, when he bets the 33k (using the facts from the real hand) he could either be signalling that he thinks my check behind on the turn was weak, or that he has the hand. However, in the hypothetical hand I’ve described, it would only be that he thought he had the hand, or he would check. In either event, there are a lot of things in his range from air all the way up to a flush, and a set of kings beats everything but a set of aces, a flush, or a wheel. The way I’ve played the hand so far, the pot would be larger than it was in the real hand, so the bet would probably be larger. You’d have plenty to win right there, so the case for raising decreases a bit, as does the risk involved in raising, as it’d be effectively a shove.

Reply

Post a Comment

Messages that harass, abuse or threaten other members; have obscene or otherwise objectionable content; have spam, commercial or advertising content or links may be removed and may result in the loss of your Card Player Account. Please do not post any private information unless you want it to be available publicly. Never assume that you are completely anonymous and cannot be identified by your posts.

Your Comment


Lost User Name or Password?

Need an account?

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed | RFID | Amazon Affiliate

CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 5:30 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , Hand, Look, Poker, Strategic, Street

No Comments »



Online Poker Blog is proudly powered by WordPress
Entries (RSS) and Comments (RSS). - Design