Posts Tagged ‘Hold’em’

CPTV Video Spotlight — Mike Leah On Turbo No-Limit Hold’em Tournaments

Mike LeahMike Leah has gotten off to a good start in 2014, recently winning a $ 1,000 prelim at the Fallsview Poker Classic just weeks after taking down a $ 5,000 no-limit hold’em turbo side event at the 2014 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure for $ 119,770. The Canadian poker pro now sits in 15th place in the overall Card Player Player of the Year standings as a result of his hot start to the year.

Card Player TV caught up with Leah recently to learn a little more about how to approach live NLH turbos, in which blind levels are far shorter than in normal events. Leah first shared some of his thoughts on how people over-adjust to the format.

“I think some people definitely play too aggressive, they think they have to adjust and play faster and they probably do that too much. I think that really all that happens [in these turbo events] is that you get to the deeper and more meaningful stages of the tournament quicker,” said Leah. “You get to where almost everybody has 20 to 30 big blinds and you almost play the entire tournament that way, so it just puts more emphasis on push-fold, when to shove and when to call… those kind of decisions as opposed to being super deep stacked and playing a lot post flop.”

Leah also discussed other ways that people adjust poorly to the format and what advice he would give someone who was going to play a turbo if he had to boil it down to one sentence. Check out all of that in the full video below:

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 5:31 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , CPTV, Hold'em, Leah, Mike, NoLimit, Spotlight, Tournaments, Turbo, Video

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Poker Strategy — No-Limit hold’em Turbos With Mike Leah

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 5:31 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , Hold'em, Leah, Mike, NoLimit, Poker, Strategy, Turbos

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Bellagio To Run $25,000 No-Limit Hold’em High Roller Event On Feb. 28

The Bellagio Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada has awarded more than $ 432 million in tournament payouts in it’s history, the second most of any casino in the world. They are continuing in this tradition of high-stakes tournament poker excellence in 2014 with a series of $ 25,000 buy-in no-limit hold’em high roller events, the next of which will take place beginning at noon local time on Feb. 28th in the historic Bellagio poker room.

Cary KatzThis will be the third of these events to happen so far this year. The first took place in late January, with Sorel Mizzi topping Joseph Cheong heads-up to win $ 149,707. Cheong also finished runner-up in the second iteration of this event, with Cary Katz emerging victorious with $ 176,069.

In this running of this event players will start with 30,000 in tournament chips at eight-handed tables, playing 30-minute levels throughout this single-day event. There will be 10-minute breaks after every three levels. Players can re-enter the tournament anytime throughout the first 9 levels.

The final table of the event will take place in the famed Bobby’s Room if space permits.

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 11:30 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , $25000, Bellagio, Event, Feb., High, Hold'em, NoLimit, Roller

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Poker Strategy: Stack Management For Limit Hold’em Tournaments

Ben YuIn the first article I ever wrote, I introduced “L” — the amount of chips required to play a hand of limit poker from start to finish — and claimed it would be a pivotal tool in tournament stack management.

Now we move on to the fun stuff — strategy in specific games, starting with limit hold’em. Many of the ideas here apply to other games as well, but I begin here as it has the fewest variables to analyze. In limit hold’em, L is 3.5 big bets, or seven big blinds.

In somewhat backwards fashion, I’m waiting until next time to discuss more general limit hold’em tournament concepts. Today, I want to write about avoiding variance deep in tournaments. Variance can be a vague word, so for this article, I would define it as “bets and raises with little edge and no fold equity, especially when for a significant portion of your stack.”

When to Minimize Variance

The two most crucial points to minimize variance are on the bubble and at the final table. It’s also relevant to a lesser degree as the bubble approaches and shortly after it bursts. These are where the pay jumps are the largest, so coin flips are the most painful.

In addition to what stage of the tournament it is, it’s also pivotal to consider how many L you have. In no-limit hold’em tournaments, you are concerned with relative stack size — your stack compared to others at the table. Even with above average chips, it is unprofitable to get in marginal confrontations when covered. In limit hold’em tournaments, what matters is actual stack size. With more than five L, it’s not dangerous to battle a big stack, as losing a hand will only cost one of those Ls.

How to Minimize Variance

Fold the bottom of your open-raising range.

When I am looking to negate variance, I open fold minimally profitable hands such as A-7 offsuit in the hijack or K-9 suited in early position. Raising a hand returning one percent return on investment (ROI) in chips loses money because of the fluctuation undertaken to squeeze it out.

This is a basic tournament idea, but deserves emphasis in limit hold’em because of the game’s structure. In no-limit hold’em, a preflop raise is a low cost way to acquire chips; you can elect to fold to a three-bet. In limit hold’em, because of the immense odds you are getting, you must see a flop, often have to peel it, and sometimes have to make turn and river calls. If we consider limit and no-limit hold’em hands having the same return, the limit hold’em one is exposed to extra variance.

For these reasons, when evaluating marginal situations in a tournament, my friends and I often refer to the Brenden Taylor rule of limit poker, named after the 2010 World Series of Poker limit hold’em bracelet winner — “It’s OK to fold preflop, it’s not OK to fold postflop.”

If opponents notice tight play, they may make an attempt to raise lighter through you, especially on your big blind. Therefore, your three-betting and blind defense ranges have to account for this. If opponents are playing particularly savage, you may end up playing even looser than your normal standards, despite not wanting to gamble. These considerations mean you still have “play poker,” but be aware that opening a hand with a small win rate is not profitable.

Don’t Bet Without Fold Equity

Several years ago, the limit hold’em landscape changed. Players stopped reraising when their range was too small, such as when facing a three-bet as a preflop raiser. The primary reason was for balance. With so few hands which could be reraised for value, it was superior to call everything and be more difficult to read postflop.

In tournaments, this serves an additional purpose — minimizing the percentage of your stack at risk. Since opponents never fold for another bet in limit, a raise increases the amount you have riding on a hand. This increased gamble dwarfs the additional equity that could be eeked out of an extra bet. Calling also creates smaller pots postflop, incentivizing all players to bluff and call down less. The smaller the pot is, the less it is worth fighting over, leading to reduced stack fluctuation for everyone involved.

An Example from my 2013 World Series of Poker

I applied these principles during three days of battle at the $ 5,000 WSOP limit hold’em event this year. With 18 players cashing, I had an above average stack with almost seven L (116,000 at 2,500-5,000 blinds) with 27 remaining. I proceeded to lose six sizeable pots, but saved a bet on four of them, leaving me the shortest stack, but not eliminated on the bubble.

Once in the money, I navigated my way to the final table despite never having more than seven L. My tools were conservative preflop folds, bluffs to capitalize on a tight image, and some all-in luck. The most notable fold was passing on A-Q offsuit versus an under-the-gun raise on the hand which eliminated Steve Landfish in tenth place, and punched my ticket to the final table. There, I was seated to the right of Domenico de Notaristefani, a loose, tough player who entered among the leaders in chips.

I estimated he would not fold more than ten percent of his big blinds if I raised the small blind and would not be surprised if he was never folding. As such, I was completing small blinds instead of raising. If he was never folding, I was unnecessarily risking a small bet and inflating the pot by two small bets, a one hundred percent increase that I’d be forced to zealously fight over.

There are certainly tradeoffs to this strategy. I am not getting value from my strong hands, whereas Notaristefani still has the option to do so. Also, the times my opponent would have folded, my limp allows him to play a free hand I could’ve picked up for free.

Negating variance does not always result in taking a conservative line. When opponents fold, there is zero variance, you take down what is in the pot. If your opponent is capable of folding, it is better to raise, both for value and to avoid the variance that comes when the opponent would have gotten a free look.

My tournament run ended in seventh place for $ 31,264. The last leg of the tournament was utterly an exercise in limit hold’em stack management. I never had more than ten times starting stack, so felt fortunate to not only cash, but sneak into my second WSOP final table. I hadn’t been in the Thunderdome for two years — it was good to be back.

I’ve written about avoiding variance as a shortstack. Now I’d like to cover a variety of nuances on a broader scale.

Limit Holdem Tournaments Versus Cash Games

Structurally, limit holdem tournaments are very similar to their cash-game sisters. The only notable differences are nothing being raked out of the pot (applies to all tournaments) and the small blind not always being half of the big blind because of level increases. In most live tournaments, there will be levels in which the small blind will be between one-third and two-thirds of the big blind.

Adjusting for Small Blind Size

Accounting for a different-sized blind is straightforward at first glance. When smaller, you should play tighter, when larger, you should play looser. However, there are subtle differences to consider. In late position, the change is a much larger consideration.

When you raise in early position, how much you win or lose in the long run is based on how your hand interacts with the entire table, resulting in more multiway pots. When you raise in late position, a larger percentage of your winrate is stealing the blinds and navigating heads-up pots where you’ve chopped up the small blind’s dead money two ways. Therefore, it’s not worth altering your range much in early position, but more crucial to adapt as it folds to you towards the button.

It’s also worth considering what hands you should become looser or tighter with. This partially depends on the small blind itself. If she adjusts by three-betting more, I add hands with showdown value to my range to prepare for heads-up confrontations. If she tends to call, I would rather increase my hand density with high implied-odds holdings such as suited connectors. Open-raising hands such as A-3 offsuit from the cutoff is much less attractive when the pot is frequently going to be three-handed.

When You Are the Small Blind

When the small blind is smaller, the obvious adjustment is to play tighter. When it is bigger, you should likewise play looser, but should that be via calling or reraising more? Many players adapt by flatting, even though they typically utilize a three-bet or fold strategy in other scenarios.

I prefer to widen my three-betting range and never call. I don’t think its horrendous to cold-call, but the immense odds I’m offering the big blind and how unbalanced my range would be make me cringe. It would be difficult to construct calling and reraising ranges which both have a variety of hands, so I avoid that problem by three-betting everything. There are situations that make calling more palatable, such as if there is a weak player in the big blind or if you heavily need to avoid variance. However, even in these situations, it’s worth considering the free information you are presenting to your opponents as the flop comes.

Play In Limit Holdem Tournaments

The most defining characteristic of limit hold’em tournaments is that players are much tighter than their cash-game selves. As levels increase, players become increasingly concerned with survival, making the money, pay jumps, and their final table prospects.
Unlike no-limit, or the stud games, there are no antes, so there are less incentives to contend for each pot. This results in more correct play, as rounders tend to be too loose in limit hold’em cash games, without amazing postflop skills to justify it. As professional Jimmy Fricke deduces, “while in no-limit hold’em tournaments, you are rewarded for your opponents playing either too tight or too loose, in limit hold’em tournaments, you’d just prefer them playing too loose.”

Bluff More, Value-Bet Less

Despite playing better, these adjustments leave themselves susceptible to other plays. The best ways to counter a weak-tight strategy are to bluff more and value-bet less. However, being selective improves this strategy — specifically, tight players are more likely to miss low and middle-card flops, which are excellent candidates to attack.

Here is an example of a strong bluff made better by a stressful tournament atmosphere:
A player raises in the lojack (seat acting before the hijack) and we defend QHeart Suit JHeart Suit in the big blind. The flop comes 8Diamond Suit 7Spade Suit 5Heart Suit and we check-raise their continuation bet, planning on betting most turns. When we don’t turn a good bluff card like a four, six, nine, or ten, we often pick up a pair or backdoor-straight and/or flush draw, buffering our equity and minimizing the punishment for shoveling money in as an underdog.

This type of bluff can be attempted in a cash game, but shines here. In the pressure cooker that is a tournament, a tight opponent is likely to have big cards which miss this flop, having folded hands such as A-8 preflop. Even when they connect with the flop, they are also more likely to fold scary turn cards with hands such as A-7 suited, in the name of stack preservation.

Even though thin value-bets are a key weapon in the arsenal of expert limit hold’em players, they are less effective when the game is played as a tournament. Hands that would normally be a river value-bet, such as third pair, become value-cuts when opponents have defaulted to check/calling instead of betting themselves.

Adjusting Your Starting Hands

The implementation of these tactics is improved if we alter our preflop range. By planning to make fewer value-bets and more bluffs, showdown value is less of an asset and lack of showdown value less of a liability. The result is that suited connectors show improved play while showdown based holdings such as A-x are worse.

The chart below illustrates some reasonable additions and subtractions from a standard opening range, using the cutoff as an example. We remove some A-x and mediocre king hands while boosting our number of suited holdings.

Know When This Doesn’t Apply

These suggestions are generalizations. I’ve certainly played in tournaments where the advice here is worse than useless. For instance, some players are tight preflop and resolve never to fold postflop — trying to bluff them is counterproductive. Even though I have diagnosed their playing style correctly, the remedies prescribed in this article would be poisonous. No matter what strategies you come into a tournament with, it’s ultimately crucial to stay focused on the hands in front of you and play poker. ♠

Ben Yu attended Stanford University but knew even before finishing that he wanted to embark on a journey to become a one of the finest professional mixed-game players. He made his debut onto the tournament scene in 2010 with a second-place finish in the World Series of Poker $ 1,500 limit hold’em shootout and followed it up in 2011 by leading the WSOP with seven cashes across six different games. In 2012, he moved to Rosarito, Mexico in order to continue playing online and was enthralled to perform well at the World Championship of Online Poker, including a final table appearance at the $ 10,300 poker 8-Game High Roller, and a cash in the main event.

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 11:30 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , Hold'em, Limit, Management, Poker, Stack, Strategy, Tournaments

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Phil Hellmuth and Johnny Chan Lend Their Likenesses To Updated Heads-Up Limit Hold’em Machine Featured

Johnny Chan and Phil Hellmuth at G2EThe Global Gaming Expo (G2E) saw 455 companies from all sectors of the gaming industry showcase their newest games, products and services at the Sands Expo and Convention Center in Las Vegas from Sept. 23-26. Somewhere between an “Avatar”-themed slots and the classic bat-mobile was a less ostentatious line of gaming machines that featured the video-likenesses of Poker Hall of Famers Phil Hellmuth and Johnny Chan playfully needling their living, breathing opponent.

Unlike most every other product on offer at this gambling smorgasbord, this particular game wasn’t simply running an algorithm that randomly doles out a prescribed jackpot based on a pay scale. The Texas Hold’em Heads Up Poker machine, the result of billions of hands of poker being run by complex neural nets playing against each other, actually plays against the customer using the game-theoretical optimal strategy that it and it’s creators developed for one-on-one poker.

The model on display at this year’s gaming expo, the flashy new version featuring Hellmuth glowering at players and uttering catchphrases, comes almost two years after gaming giant International Game Technology (IGTNYSE) first introduced the machine into casinos. Currently there are roughly 200 machines spread across large, live poker markets like Nevada, California and Mississippi. In Las Vegas alone the machines can be found at The Bellagio, Aria, The MGM Grand and The Palazzo, drawing everything from slot enthusiasts to the highest caliber poker professionals.

Numerous threads have been started in poker strategy forums, with plenty of big names weighing in with their take on the machine, it’s strategy and the possibility of achieving a consistent win rate against it. In a post on the 2+2 forum high-stakes limit pro and World Series of Poker bracelet winner Anthony Rivera gave his opinion.

“I’ve seen about 10 different [heads-up] pros playing the bot, all with their own special strategy which they are convinced is the one that beats the bot. I feel less than 95 percent certain that they are all losing players against it, and at least one of their assumptions has always been wrong. I feel after 100 hours of play against it I can break even against it. I think I’d rather play craps, though.”

Former Norwegian defense engineer Fredrik Dahl, who used to apply artificial intelligence to combat situations, utilized a similar approach first to the study of backgammon and then to heads-up limit hold’em. Malcolm Davis, who had been impressed by Dahl’s work on both games, encouraged him to try to use his research to create a gaming machine. One of the first big hurdles was the fact that gaming regulations ruled out the adaptive play that Dahl’s program was capable of.

“The neural net’s learning needs to be frozen, “Dahl told the NYTimes’ articles author, Michael Kaplan. “Ordinarily, you figure out weaknesses in your opponent and find ways to exploit those weaknesses. But because our program needs to be stable, it can’t do that. So instead it does everything it can to prevent itself from being exploited.”

Through a mutual friend Davis was able to help Dahl connect with Gregg Giuffria, a former rock star who had transitioned into designing and building gaming machines. It was Giuffria’s company, G2 Game Design, that helped take the work they had done and build it into something that they could take to IGT. The gaming giant released the machine in early 2011, and with this recent update is looking to increase the popularity of it’s unique gaming machine.

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 6:31 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , Chan, Featured, HeadsUp, Hellmuth, Hold'em, Johnny, Lend, Likenesses, Limit, Machine, Phil, their, updated

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World Series of Poker — Tom Schneider Explains Why He Doesn’t Like No-Limit Hold’em

Tom SchneiderTom Schneider is in the middle of an incredible summer, winning his third and fourth gold bracelets at the World Series of Poker and over $ 600,000 in tournament earnings. He won the only two H.O.R.S.E. events of the series and cashed in seven tournaments.

However, the 2007 WSOP Player of the Year doesn’t see a lot of poker in his future, preferring to focus on his semi-regular 9 to 5 job and his other passions and hobbies.

Schneider sat down with Card Player to discuss his success in H.O.R.S.E. and why he won’t be playing on the tournament circuit this year.

Julio Rodriguez: You now have four bracelets at the WSOP and have twice won two bracelets in the same summer. That puts you in elite company with players such as Mike Matusow, Huck Seed, Bobby Baldwin, Amarillo Slim, Tom McEvoy and others. Where do you rank yourself as a player?

Tom Schneider: I feel like I can play with any of them, but I do feel that there is a certain mystique that comes with having won your bracelets early on and getting more TV time. Some of these poker legends have a built-in advantage because others are immediately intimidated by them and I don’t think I have that. I’ve had a great summer, no doubt about it, but it’s just one summer. Let’s see how I do next year or the year after that.

Winning a tournament just means that you played that tournament really well and got pretty lucky, it doesn’t make you the best in the world. I’m confident in my H.O.R.S.E. game, but just because I won both H.O.R.S.E. events this summer doesn’t mean I’m the best H.O.R.S.E. player in the world.

JR: You are no longer playing poker full time and have taken a job as Chief Financial Officer for Loud Mouth Golf. Did you just need to take a break from the game?

TS: I’m actually moving a little bit away from poker, which sounds absurd given how successful I’ve been this summer. Honestly, I’m just a little bored with it. It’s not my passion like it was at one time. Also, I feel like having a semi-normal job outside of poker has actually helped my game. When I do play, I look forward to playing. I’m not there to waste time or go through the motions. I’m there to win money.

JR: What’s more important to you at this point of your career, the money or the prestige?

TS: It’s more about the money. I hate to say that, because I know it’s not what people want to hear, but it’s the truth. I put some money into some businesses over the years that didn’t pan out. Maybe if I had millions of dollars it would be more about the accomplishment, but right now, the notoriety that comes from winning a tournament is just a nice, added bonus.

JR: You said that you are getting bored with poker. Can you elaborate on that at all?

TS: It’s not poker, really, it’s just no-limit hold’em. If there were more mixed games on the tournament circuit, then maybe I would still be playing on it, but I just have a hard time getting excited about no-limit hold’em these days and really, it’s because of the players.

The game is played at a either a nine- or ten-handed table, so you are squished in to start with. Also, the players take forever to act on their hand, making each hand last five minutes. There is one player on the circuit in particular who is agonizingly slow and takes 30 seconds before deciding to fold preflop. I just can’t take it. He and the others who do this don’t realize that some people who come to these tournaments are taking their one shot. Maybe they made a special trip out of it, maybe they won a satellite, but he is robbing them of the opportunity to play. People who do this are ruining the game for everyone else.

JR: Let’s talk about H.O.R.S.E., starting with limit hold’em. I would think that would be the toughest game for you to have an edge in because everyone thinks they know what they are doing.

TS: The nice thing about H.O.R.S.E. is that it is played eight-handed and a lot of these limit hold’em players are more used to playing short-handed games. My edge in that game comes from patience and playing better starting hands. Other players feel a need to press in limit hold’em because it’s their best game and inevitably, that means that their opening hands are going to be a little worse than normal.

JR: Can you talk a little bit about the stud games?

TS: I actually don’t play a lot of stud high games so I don’t try to get too fancy during that round. The game has an extra round of betting, so it’s important that you don’t go off unless you are confident in your hand or read. In razz, you can get away from bad hands much earlier, so your mistakes won’t cost you as much. It’s important to know all of the steal situations and realize when you are ahead and should let your opponent keep betting into you.

Where razz feels to me like a little bit of a gambling game because fourth street can just change your hand completely, stud eight-or-better is not. You are more or less at the mercy of your up cards. I like to play a lot of hands and I can’t seem to find a lot of hands to play in stud eight-or-better. When I played that game earlier in the series, I tweeted asking someone to come down and paint something just so I could watch it dry. It really is that boring.

JR: There seem to be two prevailing schools of though for Omaha eight-or-better. There are players who like to see a lot of flops and others who like to pump the pots with raises preflop when they feel like they have the best hand.

TS: Right. I feel very comfortable playing a lot of hands in Omaha eight-or-better. Some people can’t do that because they get into trouble post-flop, but I have a pretty good sense of where I’m at in a hand. Because my opening range is so wide, I tend to extract more value later on in the hand when I get paid off.

JR: Since you won’t be hitting the circuit later this year, what will you be doing?

TS: I’m going to go back to being CFO for Loud Mouth Golf and I’ll get back into my other passions. I love writing music and singing. I love to play golf. There’s more to life than poker. Some people, even when they aren’t trying to win money, still spend their time in poker rooms. I’m no longer that type of person. I think that will keep me more focused when I do play and keep me happier when I’m away from the tables.

For complete coverage of the summer poker festival, check out our WSOP landing page.

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 12:30 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , Doesn't, Explains, Hold'em, Like, NoLimit, Poker, Schneider, Series, World

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World Series of Poker — Barny Boatman Wins $1,500 No-Limit Hold’em

Barny BoatmanEvent no. 49 of the 2013 World Series of Poker, a $ 1,500 no-limit hold’em tournament, drew 2,247 players creating a total prize pool of $ 3,033,450. After three days of action, it was London’s Barny Boatman who came out on top, scoring his first gold bracelet and a $ 546,080 first-place prize.

Boatman, who has been coming to the WSOP since 2000 and had racked up 24 previous cashes, finally got the monkey off his back.

“I had no idea who much this would mean until it happened,” said Boatman. “I’ve been coming here for quite a few years now. I must have played over a hundred gold bracelet events. I even got heads-up once. I came second. I had no idea it would feel this good, honestly.”

The 58-year-old member of the Hendon Mob was supported by dozens of Englishmen on the rail, including his brother Ross.

“It wouldn’t mean a thing unless they were all here. We all got into poker together. We traveled the world together. We come here every year. Ross is a great player. He’s my best friend. Now, the only thing that could top this off would be to see him get his day because he really deserves is. They all won it for me. They made me feel so good.”

Here is a look at the final table results.

For complete coverage of the summer poker festival, check out our WSOP landing page.

Photo Credit: Eddie Malluk/WSOP

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 12:30 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , $1500, Barny, Boatman, Hold'em, NoLimit, Poker, Series, Wins, World

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Marco Johnson Wins First WSOP Bracelet In $2,500 Six-Max Limit Hold’em

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 12:30 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , $2500, Bracelet, First, Hold'em, Johnson, Limit, Marco, SixMax, Wins, WSOP

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World Series Of Poker — Sandeep Pulusani Wins $3,000 No-Limit Hold’em

Sandeep PulusaniSandeep Pulusani, a 24-year-old music blogger who moved to Las Vegas to pursue poker professionally, won the World Series of Poker $ 3,000 no-limit hold’em event. Pulusani banked $ 592,684 and his first gold bracelet.

Pulusani went into the final table as one of the shorter stacks but he developed a strategy and was not scared by the thought of being runner-up. He just wanted to get to heads-up.

“So, my strategy was to play snug and wait for others to get knocked out,” Pulusani said. “If you get second, you can then play heads-up. That was my goal. Luckily, I was able to hit some cards.”

He moved to Las Vegas from Alabama after college in 2010. He mostly plays cash games but occasionally ventures into some tournaments as well.

The final table included a few well-known pros including Michael Rocoo, Zo Karim, Mark Teltscher and Nam Le.

Here’s a look at the final table results.

For complete coverage of the summer poker festival, check out our WSOP landing page.

Photo Credit: Joe Giron/WSOP

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 12:30 pm by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , 3000, Hold'em, NoLimit, Poker, Pulusani, Sandeep, Series, Wins, World

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Poker Strategy — Chris Moorman On Ante-Only No-Limit Hold’em

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CardPlayer Poker News


Published on 6:32 am by Administrator

Category: Poker

Tags: , AnteOnly, Chris, Hold'em, Moorman, NoLimit, Poker, Strategy

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